A black background is covered with question marks and red false, yellow Not Given and blue True words. The picture symbolise the difficulty of T/F/NG questions and the necessity for high-level reading skills

We learned A LOT ​in my first post about True / False / Not Give questions. We learned how to identify keywords (even in difficult passages); what the difference between true, false, and not given REALLY is; and how important it is to go back to the beginning of a sentence (or even a paragraph) when you are reading in detail for the answer. ​But, here’s the thing, even after learning these skills and practicing them for hours, many students still find that they have problems answering T/F/NG questions, and they don’t know WHY. And so, they reach a road block and get stuck 🚧🚧🚧. I mean, if you don’t know the REASON for your problem, how are you ever going to fix it? 🛠 So, in today’s blog,[…]

The words True, False and Not Given are written in bid blue, red and yellow letters on a black background

Are you confused by True / False / Not Given questions? Well, you are not alone. They really are question that seems to confuse IELTS test-takers most. I mean, what is the difference between False and Not Given? And if you can scan for the answers, why aren’t they easier to find?  Well, in today’s blog, I hope to finally clear up all of the basic questions you might have about True /False / Not Given questions AND look at where you might be going wrong. But first, let’s look at THE FACTS 🗂

Hey! If you are a General Training test-taker, do you ever get the feeling of deja-vu when you do multiple practice exams? The feeling that even though the texts have changed, the questions you are being asked seem to be the same? Well, if you have, WELL DONE 🎉. You’re right – the same words are used again and again. And, that’s what I want to look at in today’s blog: the words that most commonly tested in Sections 1 and 2. But, before we start THE FACTS 🗂

A cartoon tortoise with a rocket on its back denotes how different skills such as scanning can help you read faster in the IELTS exam.

If there was no time limit in the IELTS Reading exam, would you get more answers correct? ⏰ I imagine so. Because if there is one comment I read again and again its that students struggle to finish the 40 questions in 60 minutes. So, what is the key to reading more quickly? Is it scanning and skimming? Is it increasing your vocabulary? Or is it simply being able to process words more quickly in your brain? Well, that’s what we are going to be discussing in today’s blog. Why don’t we start by a quick reminder of the THREE TYPES OF READING 📚

2 red and blue jigsaw puzzle pieces are linked together on a yellow background to signify IELTS Information Match Questions

 Hey. In today’s blog, we will be continuing our in-depth look at the most problematic types of IELTS reading questions. Today, it’s Information Match Questions. And, although at first glance these questions might seem every different to the Headings Match Questions we looked at last week, as you will soon see, they are actually very similar. Plus, just like Headings Match Questions, the method that is often given to solve these test items is totally wrong. But, before we start looking at technique, let’s start by going through  THE FACTS 🗂

Black and grey lines to denote a paragraph sit on a red background. A row of question marks stand above to show how most students find it difficult to complete IELTS Heading Match Questions. Two small gremlins sit either side of the paragraph to symbolise the difficulty of the task

Hey. In this week’s blog, we are taking a detailed look at Headings Match Questions, and it’s a long one! In the first half, I’ll play detective 🕵️‍♀️ to prove why the common “method” people follow to answer these questions is the reason they are failing. Then, in the second half, I’ll put on my teacher’s hat 👩‍🏫to show you a way that DOES work, and TWO techniques that you can use to improve your performance. But first, let’s look at  THE FACTS 🗂